April222014

asoiafuniversity:

queen—of—thorns:

I know this is stupid but I’ve always thought it was weirdly endearing how Sansa names one of her primary defenses—her ladylike courtesy—after something as traditionally masculine as armor, while Arya agrees to name her actual dangerous weapon after something as stereotypically feminine as a sewing needle.

(via lighthousebeams)

April212014

roshistarpupil:

adslibitum:

© Ads Libitum : facebook / tumblr / behance

OMG

(via cognitivedissonance)

10PM
9PM
9PM

inothernews:

The winners of today’s Boston Marathon:  Meb Keflezighi, the first American man to win the race since 1983; and, in record time, Rita Jeptoo of Kenya on the women’s side.  (Photos: Charles Krupa / AP via The Boston Globe)

9PM
socimages:

The commodification of Easter festivities.
The word commodification refers to the process by which something that is not bought and sold becomes something that is.  As capitalism has progressed, more and more parts of our lives have become commodified.  Restaurants are the commodification of preparing and cleaning up meals; day care and nannying is the commodification of child raising; nursing homes is the commodification of caring for elders.
We sometimes post instances of commodification that tickle us.  Previously I posted about a company that will now put together and deliver a care package to your child at camp.  A parent just goes to the site, chooses the items they want included, and charge their credit card.  As I wrote in that post: “The ‘care’ in ‘care package’ has been, well, outsourced.”
I was equally tickled by this photograph, taken by sociologist Tristan Bridges, of pre-dyed Easter eggs. This is a delicious example of commodification.  If you don’t have the time or inclination to dye eggs as part of your Easter celebration, the market will do it for you.  No matter that this is one of those things (e.g., a supposedly enjoyable holiday activity that promotes family togetherness) that is supposed to be immune to capitalist imperatives.
While we might raise our eyebrows at this example, newly commodified goods and services often elicit this reaction.  We usually get used to the idea and, later, have a hard time imagining life any other way.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

The commodification of Easter festivities.

The word commodification refers to the process by which something that is not bought and sold becomes something that is.  As capitalism has progressed, more and more parts of our lives have become commodified.  Restaurants are the commodification of preparing and cleaning up meals; day care and nannying is the commodification of child raising; nursing homes is the commodification of caring for elders.

We sometimes post instances of commodification that tickle us.  Previously I posted about a company that will now put together and deliver a care package to your child at camp.  A parent just goes to the site, chooses the items they want included, and charge their credit card.  As I wrote in that post: “The ‘care’ in ‘care package’ has been, well, outsourced.”

I was equally tickled by this photograph, taken by sociologist Tristan Bridges, of pre-dyed Easter eggs. This is a delicious example of commodification.  If you don’t have the time or inclination to dye eggs as part of your Easter celebration, the market will do it for you.  No matter that this is one of those things (e.g., a supposedly enjoyable holiday activity that promotes family togetherness) that is supposed to be immune to capitalist imperatives.

While we might raise our eyebrows at this example, newly commodified goods and services often elicit this reaction.  We usually get used to the idea and, later, have a hard time imagining life any other way.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(via cognitivedissonance)

9PM
9PM

(Source: taeminigolf, via fullten)

omfg men 

9PM

random-feeds-on-gwuncan:

OKAY THIS VIDEO IS ICONIC TOO

(Source: random-weeds-on-gwuncan, via ruinedchildhood)

9PM
“As admirably altruistic as it sounds, the problem with voluntourism is its singular focus on the volunteer’s quest for experience, as opposed to the recipient community’s actual needs.” Opinion: The white tourist’s burden: Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex (via aljazeeraamerica)

(via cognitivedissonance)

April202014
3PM
gap:

Styld.by Spring ‘14
Blogger Sarah Yates pairs the Gap Chambray Roll-Sleeve Henley Shirt with a leather skirt for a perfectly tailored look.
See her full look on Styld.by.

gap:

Styld.by Spring ‘14

Blogger Sarah Yates pairs the Gap Chambray Roll-Sleeve Henley Shirt with a leather skirt for a perfectly tailored look.

See her full look on Styld.by.

April192014
youpje:

Korra in Kyoshi warrior gear (the training was tougher than she anticipated)

youpje:

Korra in Kyoshi warrior gear (the training was tougher than she anticipated)

(via scarredprince)

5PM

scarymarymusic:

The Notorious B.I.G. - Big Poppa

(1,466 plays)

5PM

When researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of Washington observed young people’s behavior in bars, they found that the man’s aggressiveness didn’t match his level of intoxication. There was no relationship.

Instead, men targeted women who were intoxicated.

NPR: If He’s Sexually Aggressive in Bars, It’s Not Because He’s Drunk (via glorious—headfuck)

Imagine that

(via spoiledgrrrl)

(Source: intlwomenshealth, via gtfothinspo)

← Older entries Page 1 of 412